Dan Woerner and Kate Burnet

Statement

With a vested interest in all things pulp: TV sitcoms, comics, B-horror movies and Time Life Books, Dan Woerner and Kate Burnet weave together new narratives with disparate parts through their animated videos, drawings, and installations. Certain themes and images are regular players in their work such as the desert, whales, abandoned urban landscapes, cars on fire, bad weather, flannel shirts and other instruments for taking a look at the American experience. By primarily using the language of filmmaking, the artists extract characters in order to highlight their role as conduits of heartbreak and reconciliation. Viewers are invited to contemplate the darker corners of the everyday through interactive experiences made up of videos, drawings, and props. Dan Woerner and Kate Burnet are most interested in the refuse the rest of us would prefer to forget. Their work grafts our memories of the past with our prospects for the future from fragments of pop culture and other detritus to tell stories that are old as dirt.

Bio

Kate Burnet and Dan Woerner met in a theory and practice art seminar class at Pacific Northwest College of Art in 2004.  They were randomly assigned to collaborate on a project regarding “Systems” and after one night of discussion their solution was to fly to Las Vegas and get married. The project was to end there, however, performances, video making, travel and a life as collaborators and then companions ensued. They went to India, Thailand, Vietnam, lived in the back of a truck in Texas, hunkered down in North Carolina and finally set up shop in New York City until 2015 when they moved to Bloomington, IN where they currently live. They also both teach yoga. They like long walks on the beach, watching animals on the internet, horror movies and taxidermy.

Description 

For Installation Nation, we propose a 15’ outdoor sculpture titled “Hi”, a larger-than-life raised human arm mounted to a utilitarian truncated pyramidal base. Functioning as a kind of ambiguous 1960’s sci-fi totem, “Hi” presents as a possible greeting or a gesture of surrender.  It will change when approached from a distance and offer an unexpected opportunity for investigation to those inclined.  In a time when words and subtle gestures matter, this piece will act as a monolithic tribute to human interaction.